Saturday, 21 October 2017

100th birthday of Dizzy Gillespie

(Born 21 October 1917, Cheraw, South Carolina, US)
TRUMPET VIRTUOSO who, with alto saxophonist Charlie Parker, plays a vanguard role in the bebop revolution in jazz in the 1940s/early 1950s and whose creative genius has influenced a stretch of trumpet luminaries subsequently: Fats Navarro, Miles Davis, Clifford Brown,  Booker LittleDonald Bryd, Kenny Dorham, Lee Morgan Art FarmerClarence Shaw, Richard Williams, Nat Adderley, Ted Curson, Johnny Coles, Woody Shaw, Lester Bowie, Don Cherry, Alan Shorter, Donald Ayler, Dizzy Reece, Freddie Hubbard, Jon Faddis, Wynton Marsalis, Terence Blanchard
(Charlie Parker Quintet plays Tadd Dameron’s classic composition, “Hot House” [personnel: Parker, alto saxophone; Gillespie, trumpet; Dick Hyman, piano; Sandy Block, bass; Charlie Smith, drums; recorded: Dumont Television Studios, New York, US, 24 February 1952])
(The Giants of Jazz, Live album, Copenhagen [personnel: Gillespie, trumpet; Kai Winding, trombone; Sonny Stitt, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone; Thelonious Monk, piano; Al McKibbon, bass; Art Blakey, drums; recorded: live, Tivoli, Copenhagen, Denmark, 9 November 1971])
Twitter @HerbertEkweEkwe

Thursday, 19 October 2017

ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom...

ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom
ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom
ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom
ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom
ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom
ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom
ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom
RefePendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom
ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom
ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom
ReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedomReferendumPathtoBiafraFreedom
(John Coltrane Quartet, “Resolution” {part-II of A Love Supreme suite} [personnel: Coltrane, tenor saxophone; McCoy Tyner, piano; Jimmy Garrison, bass; Elvin Jones,  drums; recorded: Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, US, 9 December 1964])
Twitter @HerbertEkweEkwe





73rd birthday of Peter Tosh

(Born 19 October 1944, Grange Hill, Jamaica)
CELEBRATED self-developed musician and Rastafarian who plays a seminal role, beginning in the 1960s, to transform reggae, Jamaica-originated music genre, into an international cultural movement engaged in opposition to centuries of African peoples’ subjugation and all other forms of oppression, and for the promotion of a fairer, equal forms of human relations across the board, offering his prodigious compositional output to the goal, especially: “Get up, Stand up”, “400 years”, “Equal rights”, “Love”, “No sympathy”, “Mama Africa”, “No nuclear war”, “Africa”, “African”, “Here comes the sun”, “Sun valley”, “Creation”, “Oppressor man”, “(You gotta walk and) don’t look back”, “Vampire”, “Apartheid”, “Why must I cry?”, “Go tell it on the mountain”, “You can’t fool me again”, “Keep on moving”
(Peter Tosh: ..“400 years”, 1975)
400 YEARS (400 years, 400 years. Wo-o-o-o)
And it’s the same –
The same (wo-o-o-o) philosophy
I’ve said it’s four hundred years;
(400 years, 400 years. Wo-o-o-o, wo-o-o-o)
Look, how long (wo-o-o-o)
And the people they (wo-o-o-o) still can’t see
Why do they fight against the poor youth of today?
And without these youths, they would be gone –
All gone astray

Come on, let’s make a move:
(make a move, make a move. Wo-o-o-o, wo-o-o-o)
I can (wo-o-o-o) see time (wo-o-o-o) - time has come
And if-a fools don’t see
(fools don’t see, fools don’t see. Wo-o-o-o)
I can’t save the youth:
The youth (wo-o-o-o) is gonna be strong
So, won’t you come with me;
I’ll take you to a land of liberty
Where we can live – live a good, good life
And be free

Look how long: 400 years, (400 years, 400 years) – 
Way too long! (wo-o-o-o)
That’s the reason my people (wo-o-o-o) - my people can’t see
Said, it’s four hundred long years – (400 years, 400 years. Wo-o-o-o)
Give me patience (wo-o-o-o) – same philosophy
It’s been 400 years, (400 years, 400 years)
Wait so long! Wo-o-o-o, wo-o-o-o
How long? 400 long, long years

(lyrics: “400 years”)
(Peter Tosh: ... “Oppressor man”, 1977)
(Peter Tosh and 14-piece band, “Get up, Stand up” [Tosh and Bob Marley composition]; recorded: Randy’s Studio, Kingston, Jamaica, 1977)
GET UP, stand up
Stand up for your rights
Get up, stand up
Don’t give up the fight

Get up, stand up
Stand up for your rights
Get up, stand up

Don’t give up the fight

You, preacher man, don’t tell me
Heaven is under the earth
You, a duppy and you don’t know
What life is really worth

It's not all that glitter is gold
And half the story has never been told
So now we see the light
We gonna stand up for your rights, come on

Get up, stand up
Stand up for your rights
Get up, stand up
Don’t give up the fight

Get up, stand up
Stand up for your rights
Get up, stand up
Don’t give up the fight

’Cause you know most people think
A great God will come from the skies
Take away everything
And left everybody dry

But if you know what life is worth
Then you would look for yours on earth
And now you see the light
We gonna stand up for your rights

Get up, stand up
Stand up for your rights
Get up, stand up
Don’t give up the fight

Get up, stand up
Stand up for your rights
Get up, stand up
Don’t give up the fight

We’re sick and tired of this game of technology
Humbly asking Jesus for his mercy
We know and we know and understand
Almighty Jah is a living man

You fool some people sometimes
But you can’t fool all the people all the time
And now we see the light
We gonna stand up for our rights

Get up, stand up
Stand up for your rights
Get up, stand up
Don’t give up the fight

Get up, stand up
Stand up for your rights
Get up, stand up
Don’t give up the fight

(lyrics: “Get up, stand up”)

Twitter @HerbertEkweEkwe


Wednesday, 18 October 2017

Indigenous People of Biafra – inexorable march to freedom


Herbert Ekwe-Ekwe

THANKS to the past two years’ extraordinarily imaginative work on the ground in Biafra and overseas by the Indigenous People of Biafra, led by Nnamdi Kanu, the Biafra freedom movement has now moved the Biafra restoration-of-independence quest inexorably on the path of fruition. Never, since the beginning of genocidist Nigeria’s occupation of Biafra on 13 January 1970, has the resistance been so assured that it has found this trajectory to victory.

IT IS precisely this breakthrough that explains the dire straits of desperation that the genocidist regime and its grouping of quislings-of-the-occupation find themselves presently: shooting Igbo youth at sight … forcefully vaccinating Igbo school children with unknown “vaccines” at sight … shooting Igbo youth at sight … forcefully vaccinating Igbo school children at sight…
(John Coltrane Quartet, “Psalm” {part-IV of A Love Supreme suite} [personnel: Coltrane, tenor saxophone; McCoy Tyner, piano; Jimmy Garrison, bass; Elvin Jones,  drums; recorded: Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, US, 9 December 1964])
Twitter @HerbertEkweEkwe


Monday, 16 October 2017

PROFILE: Chi-chi Nwanoku, bassist, professor of double bass historical studies, Royal Academy of Music London, and founder of Chineke! Foundation

(Chi-chi Nwanoku)
 (… critically-acclaimed bassist)
(Professor Nwanoku is here interviewed by Sergio MimsArise News, 12 May 2015)
Twitter @HerbertEkweEkwe




Sunday, 15 October 2017

79th birthday of Fela Anikulapo-Kuti

(Born 15 October 1938, Abeokuta, Nigeria)
Herbert Ekwe-Ekwe

CELEBRATED Afro-beat musician, bandleader and one of just a handful of genocidist Nigeria public figures, particularly in the Lagos and west region of Awolowoist/Awolowoid/Adekunleist agglomeration of Igbo genocide perpetrators and/or denialists, who consistently and unequivocally condemns the Igbo genocide (as he evocatively reminds the world in his authorised biography, Carlos MooreFela: The Bitch of a Life, Lawrence Hill, 2009: 47-49: “The Biafrans were right … That’s evident now … The I[g]bo were right … The Biafrans were f***ing right to secede...”), untiringly and expansive critic of regimes in post-Igbo genocide age-of-pestilence Nigeria, employing the expressive lyrics of his myriads of compositions and the operatic drive of his orchestra to assail genocidist sergeants and generals and corporals and “colonels” and financiers and politicians and their cohorts who control and wheel and deal in the kakistocratic lair that calls itself Nigeria
(Fela Ransome-Kuti and the Africa 70, “Everything Scatter” [recorded: LP Nigeria, Coconut PMLP1000, 1975])
Twitter @HerbertEkweEkwe

Saturday, 14 October 2017

Genocidist Nigeria: Where is Nnamdi Kanu? Where are Nnamdi Kanu’s parents?

(Nnamdi Kanu and his loving parents)
Herbert Ekwe-Ekwe

TODAY marks one month since the 14 September 2017 genocidist Nigeria military stormed the home of Nnamdi Kanu’s parents at Afaraukwu-Ibeku, eastcentral Biafra. Consequently, the whereabouts of Nnamdi Kanu, the leader of the Indigenous People of Biafra (constituted integrally in the Biafra freedom movement), and his parents, remain unknown. Scores of the Kanus’ relatives and friends were murdered during the assault and scores of others are still unaccounted for.

GENOCIDIST Nigeria surely knows that it will account for the safety of Nnamdi Kanu and his parents and take full responsibility of the consequences of that savage raid on a family home.
(The New York Contemporary Five, “Consequences” [personnel: Archie Shepp, tenor saxophone; Don Cherry, pocket trumpet; John Tchicai, alto saxophone; Don Moore, bass; JC Moses, drums; recorded: live, Jazzhus Montmarte, Copenhagen, Denmark, 15 November 1963])
Twitter @HerbertEkweEkwe